Upcoming Oracle Web Center Interaction Training

Just wanted to let you know that I (formerly Plumtree’s Lead Engineer, worked with hundreds of different Plumtree, BEA and Oracle customers and now an Oracle ACE Director) am leading a public training course over the next two weeks and if you’re interested, there are few available slots left.

We’re partnering with training provider Peak Solutions and you can find the full details on their web site. Here’s the critical information:

THIS Monday, May 3rd and Tuesday, May 4th in Harrisburg, PA
Oracle WebCenter Interaction Administration – $1,200
Deployment planning, installation, configuration, maintenance, troubleshooting, etc.

NEXT Monday, May 10th, 11th and 12th in Harrisburg, PA
Oracle WebCenter Interaction Portlet Develoment in Java and .NET (also Ruby and PHP) – $1,800
Hello world all the way through advanced portlet dev concepts like setting preferences and using caching

Please drop us a note if you’d like to attend. There are only 4-5 slots left, so please act now to reserve your space!

My Oracle OpenWorld Sessions

I’m going to be speaking in two different Oracle OpenWorld sessions on Sunday. They are OOW-S312303 — Enterprise-Enable Dynamic PHP, Ruby, Python Apps: Oracle WebCenter Interaction and OOW-S312304 — Enterprise Ruby on Rails: Rolling with JRuby on Oracle WebLogic Suite.

Here We Go Again: SXSW 2010

SXSWPanelPicker-lgI know it feels like we just put the wraps on SXSW 2009, but Panel Picker Voting is already live for 2010! This year they’re using the Panel Picker to crowdsource session proposals for all three conferences: Music, Film and Interactive (whereas in the past it has only been used for Interactive).

As you well know, Social Collective, Inc., a company I started to serve the conference industry with better and more social software tools, provided the official social network and schedule builder for SXSW 2009. We’re on tap to provide that service again this year — in fact, the site is already live at my.sxsw.com. We have some exciting new features planned for this year, so stay tuned for announcements on that front as we get closer to the event.

So, even though we’re intimately involved with SXSW, I still have to EARN the privilege of speaking there. 30% of that is decided by YOU, the voters. So, in the name of shameless self-promotion, I must ask you to vote for my proposed talks (if you think they’re worthy):

SXSW Interactive: Developer from Mars Takes on Designer from Venus
Every great project needs a designer and a developer. Yet sometimes working side-by-side can be about as fun as pulling teeth. A veteran developer and a veteran designer use real-world anecdotes to spar on the dynamics that make it challenging for people in these two disciplines to collaborate effectively.

Neo-patronage: Can It Save the Music Industry?
Starting with the idea that all recorded music should be free (as in beer), I will explore the idea that a system of “neo-patronage” — think of the way European artists were commissioned during the Renaissance — can help reinvent the beleaguered music industry to ensure that artists can get fairly compensated in a world where music is free for consumers.

You have until Friday, September 4th at 11:59PM CST to cast your vote. Thanks for your support and see you at SXSW!

Shameless Self-Promotion

panel_picker_voteAt last year’s SXSW I said to myself: “Self, you need to be speaking at this conference next year.”

Help me fulfill my self-fulfilling prophecy and please take a minute to vote for one (or both) of my proposed talks! Unlike the SXSWi Web Awards last year, you don’t have to vote every day — once is plenty.

The first is a solo presentation on the future of RSS.

The second is a panel discussion on whether it’s better to have one horizontal social network like Facebook or loads of smaller, niche social networks.

Thanks for your support.

Nominate Chris Bucchere for an Oracle OpenWorld Session

oowI’ve presented at seven Plumtree Odysseys, one BEA World and two BEA Participates. Help keep the streak alive by voting up my Oracle OpenWorld presentation!

Here’s what people had to say about my P08 preso this year. . .

Q5: What did you like most about the session?

  • The ppt presentation style!
  • Straight and to the point, dives right into it. Chris did a fantastic job!
  • very nice to hear how they put this together
  • amazing and inspiring
  • great session; should be one of the first sessions provided.

Q6: What could we do better next year?

  • bring this guy back (again)

How to Build your own Temple of Ego in Five Minutes

My wife is arguably my biggest fan, although my mom probably deserves “honorable mention.”

If you too are a fanboy or fangirl of someone, like, say Robert Scoble, you may want to know what he’s blogging about, pod/vod-casting about, Twittering about, etc. Someone put together this great aggregator called Robert Scoble’s Temple of Ego.

I thought, wouldn’t it be great if we all had our own Temples of Ego?

Back to my wife. Despite her self-professed fanhood, she’s been having trouble lately (well, okay, ever) keeping up with all my web activity. This all stems from the fact that Feedhaus, a site I built and launched last fall, was selected as a SXSW Web Award finalist and I’ve been blathering about this fact in every online setting imaginable, including here on dev2dev. (Please vote for us, BTW.)

So, with upwards of five different blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Google Reader shared items, flickr, YouTube and del.icio.us — keeping track of my enormous ego is a formidable task.

But now, with the power of the semantic web and a great tool called Yahoo! Pipes, you can create your own Temple of Ego in five minutes.

Here’s mine.

Simply go to Yahoo! Pipes, log in and create a pipe. In the “Fetch Feed” node at the top, simply enter the RSS or ATOM feed from whatever you want to include in your Temple of Ego. For example, I included all my blogs, my tweets (from Twitter), my Facebook posted items, my Google Reader Shared Items, my del.icio.us links, my flickr photos and my YouTube videos. That’s a good start.

Now, drag in a “Sort” node and sort by descending pubDate. This puts all the newest stuff first, known to geeks as “reverse chronological order.”

Finally, wire together the Fetch Feed node with the Sort node and then the Sort node with the Pipe Output node.

Now, if you’re really egotistical, you can email all your friends a link to your Temple of Ego and encourage them to add the pipe’s outbound RSS to their feed reader of choice. (Here’s mine.)

So, what on earth does this have to do with ALUI?

ALI 6.5 — which the good folks at bdg are using to build social applications for Participate.08 — has some pretty slick RSS capabilities and some really beautiful user profile pages. Imagine if everyone’s profile page had the output from their Temple of Ego embedded in it. How powerful would that be? And, with ALI 6.5 and a little Yahoo! Pipes magic, setting this up in your ALI deployment will be a breeze.

Comments

Comments are listed in date ascending order (oldest first)

  • Thanks for helping me keep the title of “your biggest fan” — your Pipe implementation is working beautifully.

    Posted by: allisonbucchere on February 13, 2008 at 1:17 PM

  • this reminds me of a similar feature on google reader that lets you create a public feed based on your tags. so i could tag multiple feeds with the same tag. then if i make that tag public, it results in a feed that combines all feeds with that tag. pipes looks to be a little more powerful with respect to sorting, etc, but if you don’t need that, reader offers a little bit of the same. james

    Posted by: jbayer on February 13, 2008 at 5:17 PM

Predictions: Will Oracle Acquire BEA?

There’s been a lot of speculation in response to some press releases from Oracle that an all-cash buyout of BEA may be immanent. More than two years ago, I made an entry on my company’s blog that said, effectively, that by acquiring Plumtree, BEA painted a target on itself to be acquired by Oracle. Here’s the snippet from my other blog dated August 28, 2005:

Will this deal make BEA even more of an acquisition target for Oracle?

Everyone I know — myself included — had a feeling that Plumtree would be acquired some day. But the major questions were 1) when and 2) by whom? Quite some time ago and long before Plumtree had its Java strategy fleshed out, there were rumors of a Microsoft takeover. Then Siebel. Then Peoplesoft. But BEA? I never would have guessed.

I personally thought Oracle would be the suitor, especially after they acquired Oblix, PeopleSoft and J.D. Edwards. After extending its tentacles into almost every enterprise software market (and proving tremendously incapable of producing any decent software applications other than a database), Oracle snapped up ERP, HR and SSO/Identity Management in the blink of an eye. It seemed reasonable to me that a good portal product that could integrate with all those applications would be a clear next target. Oracle’s portal certainly doesn’t cut the mustard. In fact, they often offer it up for free only to be beaten out by Plumtree, which is, ahem, a far cry from free.

Now the next pressing question: is Oracle even more likely to acquire Plumtree now that they’re a part of BEA? Now they’d get an excellent application server and a cross-platform, industry-leading portal. You know it crossed Larry Ellison’s mind when he heard the news. Food for thought.

I also said that BEA would keep the name Plumtree and lo-and-behold, they changed it to AquaLogic. So I wasn’t 100% right, but at least I can say that I called this one.

Comments

Comments are listed in date ascending order (oldest first)

  • Someone just walked into my office and said, “Hey, since BEA already has a dual portal strategy (ALI and WLP), what will happen if they get acquired by Oracle, which already has their own portal product?”

    Two years ago, I predicted a merging of WLP and ALI, with the result being much like ALI with the great developer tools you get from WLP and workshop tacked on to it. Obviously that’s not exactly how things played out.

    So my prediction this time is that all three portals will “seamlessly” co-exist under one roof, giving consumers plenty of ways to portalize all under the Oracle name. We’ll call it the Portal Trifecta — w00t!

    Posted by: bucchere on October 12, 2007 at 10:40 AM

  • Oracle is going to support SqlServer 2000 & 2005 for Aqualogic? And support .NET? Interesting if they would sell the Aqualogic piece of to to Microsoft. Give MOS a better external portal….?

    Posted by: vivekvp on October 12, 2007 at 11:37 AM

  • Great question, Vivek. I was surprised to see BEA pledge support for ALUI on .NET and SQL Server. I’ll be even more surprised to see that happen over at Oracle. Remember though, Oracle runs on Windows!

    Posted by: bucchere on October 12, 2007 at 12:08 PM

  • Chris, don’t you mean 4 portal products; ALUI, WLP, Oracle Portal, and WebCenter? The merger makes a lot of sense from my view point, but in all seriousness the one area which will need a lot of help is Portal. IBM has only one WebSphere Portal code base.

    Posted by: Dr. BEA Good on October 16, 2007 at 9:33 PM

  • It’s hard to image that a company maintains three or four full-featured portal products, even a giant like IBM, Oracle or MS.

    Posted by: caiwenliang on October 17, 2007 at 5:16 AM

  • Four portals? Yikes! I just don’t want confused consumers to go off and buy Sharepoint or WebSphere portal when I think ALUI and WLP are superior products.

    Posted by: bucchere on October 18, 2007 at 2:11 PM