Sneak Preview of Chris Bucchere’s SXSW RSS Preso at the Oracle Open World Unconference

oow(2)For anyone attending Oracle Open World, I’m planning to give a preview of my SXSW 2009 talk entitled “Not So Simple Any More: RSS’s Bleeding Edge” in the unconference track at OOW. (This will happen regardless of whether or not SXSW selects my talk for inclusion in the 2009 agenda.)

The talk is scheduled for Monday, 22 September 2008 at 2 PM Pacific in Moscone Overlook II. BTW, I’ll probably be spending most of my time in the unconference track at OOW, because I’m just that kind of guy.

Shameless Self-Promotion

panel_picker_voteAt last year’s SXSW I said to myself: “Self, you need to be speaking at this conference next year.”

Help me fulfill my self-fulfilling prophecy and please take a minute to vote for one (or both) of my proposed talks! Unlike the SXSWi Web Awards last year, you don’t have to vote every day — once is plenty.

The first is a solo presentation on the future of RSS.

The second is a panel discussion on whether it’s better to have one horizontal social network like Facebook or loads of smaller, niche social networks.

Thanks for your support.

Chris Bucchere Speaking at the NovaRUG on June 18th, 2008

Calling all local Rubyists! I’m speaking about modular page design in Ruby on Rails at tomorrow night’s NovaRUG. The title of my talk is “To Portal or Not to Portal: How to Build DRY, Truly Modular Mashups in Rails.”

The meat of my talk is going to come from these two recent blog posts:

Modular Page Assembly in Rails (Part 1)
Modular Page Assembly in Rails (Part 2)

I’ll be followed by Arild Shirazi of FGM giving a presentation entitled “CSS for Developers.”

Get all the details here.

P.S.: Free pizza!

Nominate Chris Bucchere for an Oracle OpenWorld Session

oowI’ve presented at seven Plumtree Odysseys, one BEA World and two BEA Participates. Help keep the streak alive by voting up my Oracle OpenWorld presentation!

Here’s what people had to say about my P08 preso this year. . .

Q5: What did you like most about the session?

  • The ppt presentation style!
  • Straight and to the point, dives right into it. Chris did a fantastic job!
  • very nice to hear how they put this together
  • amazing and inspiring
  • great session; should be one of the first sessions provided.

Q6: What could we do better next year?

  • bring this guy back (again)

BEA Participate is Only Two Weeks Away

There’s still time to register for this great conference and take part in a one-of-a-kind social computing experiment.

Register now!

Comments

Comments are listed in date ascending order (oldest first)

  • I heard some rumors that this event is going to demo some seriously killer app love that will blow people away. OK – they’re not rumors. It’s just common sense when you put this much brain power and off the wall creativity in one spot. I’m all for long fireside chats about protocols and geek plumbing (/swoon), but what really excites me about Participate is the ability to kick back with developers, product managers, and engineers and talk about business challenges and solutions – then arm you with the tools and tricks to get your business humming. Got a problem? Chances are these pros have a suggestion that will make your life easier and your business users that much more productive. Food, folks, fun, and forward thinking. You just can’t beat that.

    Posted by: ewwhitley on April 29, 2008 at 5:16 PM

  • Tada! The triumphant return of Eric Whitley to dev2dev!

    Posted by: bucchere on April 30, 2008 at 12:33 PM

Enterprise Relevance of Web 2.0 (in six parts)

Back in November of 2007 I gave a one-hour talk in Tyson’s Corner, VA entitled “The Enterprise Relevance of Web 2.0.” There were probably about thirty people in attendance. Since then, I’ve had several people tell me that they were sorry they missed the talk, etc. If you were one of those people, these next six posts are for you.

Why I am delivering this content in a six-part series?

I don’t have a video streaming server set up nor do I care to put one up and pay for the bandwidth. So, YouTube is an obvious solution to the hosting and bandwidth problem. Unfortunately, YouTube has a ten-minute limit on the length of uploaded videos. So, I needed to edit my talk into six, ten-minute clips.

Therein lies the problem.

What I’m learning in the process is that HD video editing is hard, even on a Mac. The first problem is space: I’ve got about five gigs of raw footage. My conversion program, Voltaic, was choking near the end of each 2 Gb conversion, so I switched to a PC (for shame!) and used the software that came with the camera (a Sony HDR-SR5) to convert from MTS (raw AVCHD format) to MPEG-2. Then I needed to buy a program from Apple for $19.99 (thanks for nickel-n-dime’n me, Steve) to convert from MPEG-2 to MOV (QuickTime format). Now I’m importing into iMovieHD. Each one of these conversions takes about two hours and has an output between 2x and 12x the size of the original MTS file! That means, just to be safe, you need like 15Gb of scratch space to edit a 1Gb movie! On top of the space issue, I’ve hit Google already dozens of times to figure out how to deal with things like frame rates, aspect ratios, sound compression, format conversion, and so on, ad infinitum.

And this is supposed to be easy! I’m on a Mac for goodness’s sake!

So, why am I ranting about my video editing woes in a post that’s purportedly about the enterprise relevance of Web 2.0? Because I think there’s a lesson to be learned from all this.

If personal computing is this challenging, that does not bode well for the enterprise, where everything is 10-100 times more expensive and 10-100 times more complicated.

Is this a good thing? For me and my company, maybe, because we’re making a living trying to make sense of the complexities of the enterprise and building user interfaces that help abstract people away from all the complexity so that they can do their jobs effectively.

But to truly bring Web 2.0 to the enterprise, we need to take these concepts — abstracting, simplifying, beautifying and “social-ifying” — enterprise applications down to the point at which they’re simple, beautiful and fun to use, all the while maintaining their power and utility. The experience people have using corporate software should mirror the experience they have using well designed, functional sites like Netflix, Facebook, Wishlistr, Dopplr and Kayak.

Most people writing corporate/enterprise software these days — with a few notable exceptions like 37 Signals (the makers of Campfire, Basecamp and Highrise) — are stuck in a function-over-form rut that’s really hindering the process of bringing Web 2.0 to the enterprise. Those of you who have had the pleasure of using AquaLogic Pages know that it doesn’t have to be this way.

Software can be both fun and functional at the same time.

So that’s an awfully long-winded and angst-ridden introduction to my six-part series on bringing Web 2.0 to the enterprise. If any of the above struck a chord with you and resonated even a little bit, then I highly recommend that you check out the forthcoming videos.

That is, assuming that I actually succeed in producing them!

While you’re waiting for the videos, you can check out the slide deck.

[metaslider id=954]

 

Comments

Comments are listed in date ascending order (oldest first)

  • Chris, enjoyed your post. I’ve got a little one on the way so I imagine I’ll have to understand all of the video nuances of encodings/converstions soon for youtubing for the grandparents. It doesn’t look like it’s going to be as easy as I thought! James

    Posted by: jbayer on January 23, 2008 at 7:44 AM

The Enterprise Relevance of Web 2.0

Register Now!

The concepts behind Web 2.0, social networks, and collaboration are now poised to transform your enterprise, providing solutions such as collaborative mashups, expertise discovery and social search to enhance your existing portal.

According to Gartner, Web 2.0 will have a major impact on a broad range of traditional enterprises. Gartner states that “positive business model change will result in unexpected ways, and enterprises must prepare for this transition.”

Register to attend this exciting seminar on Wednesday, November 14th, 6:00 pm and hear how BEA’s three new products will “two-dot-oh” your company’s Web along with other topics that include:

  • How Web 2.0 can bring true value to your business
  • How to differentiate between Web 2.0 and Enterprise 2.0
  • How to implement new Web 2.0 concepts like blogging, wikis, tagging and social networking into your business and allow IT governance and control
  • How to enhance your existing portal infrastructure

Enjoy free hors d’oeuvres and an open bar along with presentations that define Web 2.0 and show how BEA’s new social computing products Pages, Ensemble and Pathways can deliver true business value from Web 2.0 and bdg’s newest products that bridge the gap between Web 2.0 and the enterprise.

Attendance is limited, so please take a moment to register now. I look forward to meeting you at the event.

Date: Wednesday, November 14th
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Location: Marriott Tyson’s Corner

8028 Leesburg Pike
Vienna, VA, 22182
(703) 734-3200

Directions

Register Now!

Comments

Comments are listed in date ascending order (oldest first)

  • I’m sorry I missed this! If you have a notification list for events like these please include me, I’d love to hear about future events you guys sponsor. [email protected] Thanks!

    Posted by: geoffgarcia on January 17, 2008 at 1:33 PM

  • Hi Geoff! The event was down here in Tyson’s Corner, VA, so we focused on local attendees. I’ll make sure to include you next time, even though if my memory serves me correctly, you’re up in NY.

    Posted by: bucchere on January 17, 2008 at 6:47 PM

  • Oh, I almost forgot. If I can find the time, I’ll put together a video podcast of the event. I have the footage; I just haven’t had the time to do the editing. 🙁

    Posted by: bucchere on January 17, 2008 at 6:48 PM

BEA Participate 2008 Announced

From an e-mail I just received:

product-page-short-bg-1Mark your calendar today to attend a gathering of BEA customers, partners and product experts in Chicago, Illinois from May 12-15th, 2008.

BEAParticipate 2008, is a 2 ½ day event for our user community of innovators, to share experiences and best practices around the adoption of business process management, collaboration, portal and social computing technologies.

This coming year will feature more networking opportunities than ever — from industry roundtables, lunches, and evening receptions, to a partner and solution pavilion and product focus groups. This is a sure-fire opportunity to form lasting connections with your peers, and gain valuable insights from shared experiences in a hands-on, energetic setting.

Whether you are just starting out or have a long docket of active projects, this is the best forum to meet with BEA executives, engineering and product leaders, pick up useful tidbits from other innovative customers, and acquire new strategies for optimizing your business, improving knowledge worker productivity and increasing IT efficiency.

Don’t miss this interactive and social event! If you are interested in participating, have suggestions for topics, or have any questions, please send an e-mail to Participate.

Save the Date:
BEAParticipate 2008
May 12-15, 2008
Hyatt Regency
151 East Wacker Drive
Chicago, Illinois 60601

To learn more about the Hyatt Regency in the heart of Chicago, click here.

Stay tuned for registration information, agenda and pricing details in the coming weeks.